2011 publication 5Over the past several years the speed advantages of induction cooking have been challenged by incorporating “heat-sink” technology into pieces of traditional aluminum cookware. Yes, the familiar heat-sink that is commonly found in the electronic industry to absorb heat in computers, televisions, radios, etc. has found its way into the foodservice industry. So this same technology that is designed to keep microprocessors cool in a computer can be used to make cookware hot. So by incorporating a heat-sink onto the base of a piece of cookware, the “fins” help transfer heat from the flame to the cookware.

The energy efficiency improvement from Eneron, the company that pioneered this innovative “technology,” has been independently tested by the PG&E Food Service Technology Center. The report states, “Where previous efforts to improve energy efficiency have focused on the rang top, Eneron, Inc. has taken the approach of focusing on the cooking vessel. Using the Eneron, Inc. stock pots proved to be a remarkably effective method of increasing range-top performance.”

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